Johnnie Coe

Native Tulsan, 98 ½ years old

Joan Agnes “Johnnie” Coe lived her whole life in Tulsa, Oklahoma, graduating from Central High School and the University of Tulsa. Her parents lived in the downtown area and she would ride the streetcar to TU. While at TU she joined the Phi Mu Sorority and was active in the local alumni group until her death. Upon graduation, Johnnie began her career with Stanolind Oil and Gas Company. This company was sold many times during her 30 years there, eventually being bought by Amoco, then British Petroleum. She retired in 1972 to care for her mother. By then she had been promoted to the position of Senior Clerk in the Controllers Department. She worked part-time an additional six years for a private, local company and then retired for good. Upon retirement, Johnnie became very active in her beloved First Presbyterian Church, holding the honored position of the longest living member, serving as a Deacon, on the History and Archives Committee, Christian Fellowship Sunday School Class and the Presbyterian Women Circle of Lydia.

Johnnie was born on March 10, 1915 and was 98 1/2 when she recorded this interview. She died just over two months later on December 19, 2013.

Interview with Johnnie Coe

Program Credits:
Johnnie Coe — Interviewee
Mary Ann Hille — Interviewee
John Erling — Interviewer
Mel Myers — Announcer

Honest Media
Mel Myers — Audio Editor
melmyershonestmedia@cox.net

Müllerhaus Legacy Website Team
http://www.MullerhausLegacy.com
Douglas Miller — Art Director
Mark DeMoss — Webmaster
Laura Hyde — Upload Coordinator

Date Created: October 28, 2013

Date Published: October 28, 2019

Notes: Recorded by John Erling in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Digital Audio Sound Recording, Non-Music.

Tags: Civil War, Georgia, Horace Mann, University of Tulsa, Street car, Waite Philips, Great Depression, Tulsa Club, Franklyn Roosevelt, Siloam Springs, Arkansas, Oral Roberts, Cain’s Ball Room, Grits, St. Louis Cardinals, Tennis, Panic of 1893, Tulsa Race Riot, Tulsa Race Massacre, Pearl Harbor, World War II, First Presbyterian Church