Jenny Brouse

Business Owner / Community Leader

Brouse’s Shoe Store in Utica Square was a prominent business for many years in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Jenny Brouse was partner, buyer, and secretary/treasurer for the family-owned business from 1975 until its closing in July of 2011.

While attending college, Jenny’s husband, Sidney, worked as a shoe salesman, which eventually led to the business of shoes.

Jenny’s father, Harry Robinowitz, came to the United States in 1914 from Russia. And her mother, Briana Robinowitz, along with others, escaped Russia in 1922. The oil boom in Oklahoma eventually brought the family to Tulsa.

Jenny graduated from the University of Tulsa in 1945, and was a substitute teacher for many years in Tulsa public schools, and a director for the Margaret Hudson Program. She was a volunteer and community leader for many causes, including president of the Tulsa Jewish Community Council, which was the forerunner of the Jewish Federation of Tulsa. And Jenny was a founding member and past president of the Tulsa Center for the Physically Limited. Now the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges.

Jenny, along with her son Brian, is heard in this oral history interview telling this story from Russia to Tulsa on VoicesofOklahoma.com.

Jenny Brouse was ninety-three when she died, January 21, 2018.

Interview with Jenny Brouse

Program Credits:
Jenny Brouse — Interviewee
Brian Brouse — Interviewee
John Erling — Interviewer
Mel Myers — Announcer

Honest Media
Mel Myers — Audio Editor
[email protected]

Müllerhaus Legacy Website Team
http://www.MullerhausLegacy.com
Douglas Miller — Art Director
Mark DeMoss — Webmaster
Laura Hyde — Upload Coordinator

Date Created: July 6, 2011

Date Published: February 6, 2018

Notes: Recorded by John Erling in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Digital Audio Sound Recording, Non-Music.

Tags: The University of Tulsa, race riot, Philippines, Dwight Eisenhower, Patton’s Third Army, Renberg’s, Helmerich, Margaret Hudson, Jewish Federation, Henry Zarrow, Repair the world, Brouse’s Shoes, Russian Jews